The inventors behind milkymeter

Milkymeter and MICROWETER TECHNOLOGY are both invented by two young Danish engineers, Henrik Schneider, MSc, PhD and Kristian Lindberg-Poulsen, MSc who met at the Danish Technical University (DTU) during their PhD studies. Together, they have founded the company Senserna.

Read more about Senserna at www.senserna.com

The idea of knowing temperature within the microwave

The idea to improve heating in microwave ovens came in 2013. Henrik and Kristian were frequent users of the microwave for heating up lunch, and were frustrated about the problem of over or underheating. They thought it should be possible to do this better! At the time, Henrik's daugther was still a baby, it was therefore natural for the first product to be one that would make life easier for parents struggling to make a baby bottle ready quickly at the right temperature. The idea of milkymeter was born.

The development of MICROWETER TECHNOLOGY

Moving from idea to concept, building a company and a product is a huge task. During the development phase, Senserna has participated in accelerator programs like Danish Tech Challenge in 2016 (picture), SCALEit in Silicon Valley in June 2017 and have been supported by e.g. The Market Development Fund and Innovation Fund Denmark.

MICROWETER TECHNOLOGY

milkymeter is the first product using the patented MICROWETER TECHNOLOGY. This technology makes it possible to harvests energy from the microwaves and transform it into power for temperature sensors, thereby making it possible to measure temperature development in a microwave oven. Knowing the temperature gives you control of the heating process and enables you to reach the desired temperature. Works without wire or battery - a huge advantage for the user and better for the environment.

All products with MICROWETER TECHNOLOGY will be marked with the MW logo. Temperature sensors with this logo can be used in a microwave oven.

Read more about Microweter Technology: www.senserna.com

 

Right temperature

Milkymeter has a number of sensors that measure temperature several places in the bottle. An advanced algoritm calculates the expected average temperature and starts the flashing of a green light at body temperature. The algoritm makes sure this is done, regardless of the amount of milk in the bottle (though minimum to the sign on the milkymeter), or the type of microwave.